Outputs

Framework

GCAN Framework

The GCAN framework serves as a tool to help better understand the linkages among climate, gender, and nutrition at multiple scales and over different time horizons. The framework also serves to identify entry points for policies, technologies and institutions that enhance synergies and reduce tradeoffs across the three development goals of nutrition, women’s empowerment and resilience that all form part of the 2016 Global Food Security Act.

Tools

2016 GCAN AgriLinks Webinar

Special webinar on how the Feed the Future Gender-Sensitive Climate-Smart Agriculture for Nutrition (GCAN) initiative aims to support USAID on the new Global Food Security Strategy.

Cambodia CSA-GLEE field trip 2016

2016 USAID CSA-GLEE

In December 2016, the USAID Bureau for Food Security, in collaboration with the USAID/Cambodia Mission, convened the Climate-Smart Agriculture Global Learning and Evidence Exchange (CSA-GLEE) meeting in Siem Reap, Cambodia, to deepen collaboration efforts and action on climate-smart agriculture.

Climate Change and Nutrition Linkages – Discussion Paper, Policy Note, Slide Deck

The intersection of climate change, food security, and nutrition is critical given growing adverse climate change impacts that threaten food security and nutrition outcomes, especially for the most vulnerable in the global South. The GCAN team put together a discussion paper which uses a food systems approach to analyze the bidirectional relationships between climate change and food and nutrition along the entire food value chain.

GCAN presentation to USAID mission in Bangladesh

During a week-long visit in Bangladesh in January 2017, the GCAN team presented key climate-gender-nutrition linkages. Productive discussions took place between the GCAN team and USAID Mission staff on priorities and potential research topics that would inform USAID's programming in Bangladesh. The GCAN team also met with local implementing partners and stakeholders to gather information on current initiatives related to climate-gender-nutrition linkages in Bangladesh. The GCAN team and the USAID Bangladesh Mission are currently working together to move these research topics forward. GCAN presentation to Bangladesh USAID Mission slide deck

GCAN presentation to USAID mission in Cambodia

During a week-long visit in Cambodia in December 2016, the GCAN team presented key climate-gender-nutrition linkages to the USAID Mission. Productive discussions took place between the GCAN team and USAID Mission staff on priorities and potential research topics that would inform USAID's programming in Cambodia. The GCAN team also met with local implementing partners and stakeholders to gather information on current initiatives related to climate-gender-nutrition linkages in Cambodia. GCAN presentation to Cambodia USAID mission slide deck

GCAN presentation to USAID mission in Zambia

During a week-long visit in Zambia in November 2016, the GCAN team presented key climate-gender-nutrition linkages to the USAID Mission. Productive discussions took place between the GCAN team and USAID Mission staff on priorities and potential research topics that would inform USAID's programming in Zambia. The GCAN team also met with local implementing partners and stakeholders to gather information on current initiatives related to climate-gender-nutrition linkages in Zambia. GCAN presentation to Zambia USAID Mission slide deck

GCAN at the Gender and Resilience Working Group

IFPRI hosted a recent meeting of the Gender and Resilience Working Group meeting on June 26, 2017, where two members of the GCAN Team, Elizabeth Bryan and Sophie Theis, presented the GCAN framework. The presentation provided the rationale behind the framework and explained how it compliments other frameworks on resilience, agriculture and nutrition. Members of the working group presented plans for the development of a gender and resilience framework currently being designed by the group. Discussions were held on how the GCAN framework might inform the gender and resilience framework and how both can be applied to strengthen the integration of climate resilience, gender and nutrition into project implementation.

GCAN presentation to USAID Mission in Nigeria

During a week-long visit in Nigeria in May 2017, the GCAN team presented key climate-gender-nutrition linkages to the USAID Mission. Productive discussions took place between the GCAN team and USAID Mission staff on priorities and potential research topics that would inform USAID's programming in Nigeria. The GCAN team also helped the mission with the Climate Risk Screening and Management of their different activities.  GCAN presentation to Nigeria USAID mission - slide deck

Policy note on the interlinkages of Climate Change, Gender and Nutrition in Nigeria

Increasing temperature, erratic rainfall, and other extreme events, such as floods and droughts, pose severe threats to development in Nigeria. Climate change will have significant adverse impacts on crop production and livelihoods, making the country’s poor and disadvantaged people even more vulnerable. It is imperative that the impact of relevant climate science on agricultural production be considered, together with important cross-cutting issues that influence agricultural growth, poverty alleviation, and climate resilience—especially gender and nutrition—if the goals of Feed the Future and the Global Food Security Strategy are to be achieved. This policy note summarizes assessments of these interlinkages in the Nigerian context under GCAN.

Research Priorities for Bangladesh – Policy Note

Climate change, coupled with high levels of poverty and population density, is a substantial threat to sustainable development in Bangladesh. Climate-related threats, such as flooding, inundation, salt-water intrusion, and changes in temperatures are increasing with climate change. Achieving the goals of Feed the Future and the Global Food Security Strategy requires careful consideration of the impact of relevant climate science on agricultural production, while at the same time considering other cross-cutting issues that influence agricultural growth, poverty alleviation, and resilience—especially gender and nutrition. This policy note summarizes assessments of these linkages in Bangladesh under GCAN.

Research Priorities for Cambodia – Policy Note

Agriculture is extremely important to Cambodia, representing at least one-third of the nation’s gross domestic product and providing employment to around 60 percent of the labor force. It is perhaps the most sensitive sector to changes in climate, with higher temperatures stressing plants, livestock, and workers, and rainfall variation through droughts and floods leading to crop losses and food insecurity. While it is important to consider the impact of climate change on agricultural production, it is also important to consider other cross-cutting issues to achieve the goals of Feed the Future and the Global Food Security Strategy—especially gender and nutrition. This policy note summarizes assessments of these linkages in Cambodia under GCAN

Research Priorities for Zambia – Policy Note

Climate change is a substantial threat to sustainable development in Zambia, a country experiencing weather hazards, drought and dry spells, seasonal and flash floods, and extreme temperatures that may well increase under climate change. Achieving the goals of Feed the Future and the Global Food Security Strategy requires careful consideration of the impact of relevant climate science on agricultural production, while at the same time considering other cross-cutting issues that influence agriculture-led poverty alleviation, resilience, and nutrition—such as gender. This policy note summarizes assessments of these linkages for Zambia under GCAN.

Mapping

Bangladesh Mapping

For Bangladesh, the IFPRI team will set up an econometric model using the Bangladesh Integrated Household Survey 2011-2 and 2015-6 to test for the effect of biophysical variables like soils or weather on socio-economic characteristics of the households with a focus on climate-gender-nutrition relationships. This novel use of spatial analysis techniques can suggest policy advice tailored to different agro-ecologies and household types. The IFPRI team will adopt an explicit strategy to support researchers and policy makers who would like to explore different linkages and answer interesting policy as well as research questions. We will document the output of this process, from the raw data to the end-results, so that it can be reproduced by others.

Datasets

BIHS Harmonized Dataset

To facilitate the use of Feed-the-Future Open Agriculture and Nutrition Datasets in agricultural research and development, the IFPRI's Gender, Climate Change and Nutrition Integration (GCAN) team harmonized and standardized the Bangladesh Integrated Household Survey (BIHS) (2011 and 2015, available on IFPRI Dataverse) across four key food security-relevant domains (climate, agriculture, nutrition, and gender), with the objective to make household-level data more accessible and interoperable with other databases, and in particular with spatially-explicit, biophysical data layers. The harmonization and standardization will allow users to work with the BIHS and other Feed-the-Future survey data across countries, with the same variable definitions, labels, and contents.

Zambia RALS Harmonized Dataset

The team processed the Feed the Future baseline and interim datasets for Zambia, applying standard processing methods to enhance their accessibility, interoperability, and comparison with other FTF datasets. This work entailed standardization of variable names and labels, the creation of derived socio-economic indicators such as dietary diversity scores, household dependency ratios, and household age and gender composition variables. Moreover, the provision of household GIS coordinates (offset for confidentiality purposes) would allow users to match data at different levels. The team used and processed the Rural Agricultural Livelihood Survey (RALS) 2012 and 2015, although the dataset at the unit-level cannot be shared as of yet pending confirmation of the data sharing agreements with the data provider.